Leadership Characteristics Have Changed. Are You Prepared?

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Did the
pandemic disrupt corporate norms, or did it just accelerate the changes that would occur anyway, with the result that corporate leaders face a completely different situation than they did just 18 months ago? The skills and characteristics necessary for effective leadership have changed.
Learning leaders may feel this more acutely than leaders in other departments for two reasons: Learning leaders must reflect these changes when leading their teams. Additionally, they are typically responsible for mentoring and training leaders across the organization who need to develop or enhance these key skills.
This article explores four ways that norms and expectations for leadership skills, characteristics, and behaviors change.
1. Shift to a flexible workplace model
‘s ability to function and demonstrate flexibility in unpredictable environments and enable employees to balance work needs with family, family and self-care needs is a hallmark of the COVID era . Leaders find that this ability to demonstrate flexibility continues to be essential as organizations and their employees adapt to new work standards in the office or on mixed and remote teams.
As equipment adjusts to the new configuration, many employees embrace the flexibility of working from home, an option many employees requested prior to COVID. Some leaders who reject remote work arrangements due to concerns about reduced productivity or strained team connections are seeking technical solutions: Learning leaders have paved the way for the adoption of new tools that make working relationships asynchronous and global remote controls are more collaborative and productive.
However, the flexibility of the workplace not only affects the posture of employees at work, but also involves all aspects of employee experience. Learning leaders and organizational managers are learning that while planning is still important, the ability to set aside carefully crafted plans and rotate them to adapt to a rapidly changing environment is also important.
In Forbes, leadership strategist Dan Pontefract cited office space as “designed for creativity, collaboration, community, and focused work, allowing employees to find the right space for each task” and “prioritize sustainability “And healthy office building” as a “great” feature SAP recently announced a flexible working model. These functions support flexible work arrangements that emphasize personal productivity and teamwork.
Use leadership to improve WFH’s flexibility.
The adoption of flexible remote and mixed team configurations usually extends to individual employees choosing their own work schedules. Leaders should limit this flexibility, Nicholas Bloom wrote in HBR, providing two evidence-based reasons for leaders to retain some degree of control over work schedules:
In-group / Out-of-group: whether or not workers choose Given their hours, home workers often report feeling left out. They know they are wasting valuable social and professional contact time, which can lead to anxiety. In many organizations, the fact that a person works on the site or from home also has a real impact on the projects and promotions they receive.
Impact on diversity: Compared to men with children or adults without children, women with children want to work from home much more. “This is concerning because there is evidence that when a colleague is working from home in the office it can affect their career, “wrote Bloom. He and others envisioned a future in which women would lag behind as the men who worked there “pushed the business forward.”
attention is effective. Bloom cites research and “comments I have heard from managers over the years” to show that employees working from home are ignored when promoted to office employees.
While embracing the flexibility provided by the hybrid schedule, Bloom recommends that managers set specific dates when all workers are on site to balance productivity needs with employee preferences and the goal of creating and maintaining a diverse and inclusive workforce. When training remote and hybrid team managers, learning leaders may consider emphasizing the need for diversity.
2. Loosen the handle; employees want more autonomy.
Flexible work arrangements and months of working at home, as well as taking into account family obligations and work, have enabled many employees to become more autonomous and make more decisions than before COVID19. This represents a slight shift in power, as the leader loses some control over the process and schedule.
However, it would be wrong to treat it as negative. “A company that gives employees some autonomy and decision-making power is the best company,” said Caroline Kennedy, who writes for Ceoworld magazine. Kennedy believes that leaders who let go of some power will increase the agility of the team, which is beneficial to the organization in the long run.
Empowering people is a leadership method that can bring results: According to Forbes, if you hire the right people and provide them with the tools and support they need, you will show leadership by guiding them forward . “It’s not just about telling others what to do or what you believe in; however, this investment is offset by deeper commitment, greater empowerment, and more growth for everyone.”
3. Embrace personalization
More The trend of personalization predates COVID19, but the rapid shift to working from home may accelerate the momentum. Employees want more autonomy and flexibility in working hours and locations, as well as what they learn, how they work, and how long they interact with others. And the way, whether they are colleagues, clients or friends. Organizations that are adapting to this trend need greater flexibility to allow greater autonomy, as described above. The other is to recognize that employees have skills and interests beyond their current job functions and encourage them to develop these skills in a way that benefits both employees and the organization. This is evident in the growing focus on improving employee skills and hiring from within, increasing job mobility to support employee development and filling skills gaps.
Leaders who develop critical thinking and decision-making skills among team members and foster different perspectives will likely find themselves leading an innovative team that is good at solving problems and promoting corporate goals. Learning leaders can find these skills

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