Ad Hoc Agility Isn’t Real; L&D Needs Maturity More Than Ever

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When the workforce moved mainly to remote work, his L&D team was praised for moving agilely to help the organization recover. You reacted well to this situation, but did you learn from it? If you again want to know how the latest workforce change-back to the office or mixed team-will affect your team and your work, this indicates that the learning culture of your organization or team is immature.
The problem of learning maturity is very common in organizations, not just in the training and development department. To compound the problem, learning leaders and their teams often have unstable project workloads.
Fortunately, as an L&D leader, you can do something to help your department mature (or confirm that it has matured). To help learning leaders who are preparing training and development teams for the next wave of change, I will study the topics of learning maturity and agility. I will also provide some tips to help you hardly sweat in the face of changing litigation.
The interaction of maturity and agility
As your training and development teams mature, they become less passive and more proactive, which ultimately leads to becoming agile. This agility helps to cope with dynamic changes, usually without warning, such as the entire workforce being transferred to remote work in an efficient and adaptive manner. Not to mention management with operational skills: Maintain (if not improved) the continuity of an efficient and collaborative workforce by increasing agility.
So what does maturity look like? Maturity is related to many things, such as workflow. Simple things such as style guides, naming conventions, or a central file repository with a common file structure are all essential for efficient operation. However, everyone should use them consistently and in the same way.
The maturity of the L&D team
Let us think about the maturity and agility of the team beyond digital solutions: Is there only one member of the
team that has been trained to put the product into the LMS, or is there a backup resource?
Is there a team charter agreement under which team members can call temporary Scrum to obtain information and suggestions from the team under specific project issues?
Do you run high-demand projects with leaders and substitutes to minimize risk?
Do team members update the list of vendors and contractors with available bandwidth every month?
Each of these points focuses on improving the operational processes of project efficiency and risk mitigation, and of course agility.
Maturity and mature project management provide a platform for agility: If your L&D team must change direction and adapt to rapidly changing projects, then learning leaders with mature teams will believe that they can change the priorities of team members And keep the current project work moving.
Now, how can you do this for your team, or verify your identity?
Maturity and perfect processes and practices
Whether it is the status quo of people returning to the office or other major initiatives that may shake your learning and development department, understanding their maturity will ease your efforts. You can gain this knowledge by conducting an audit.
The most common and easiest place to start adjusting the maturity of a learning and development team is through practice and process. By asking the following questions, broadly think about the overall operational framework under which your team operates:
Does my team have established standards and procedures to manage all types of projects and products?
Does my team follow these processes, style standards, templates, etc.? Repeat consistently?
Do I have a functional understanding of the current capacity and estimated bandwidth of the device?
Do I understand the future needs of the department and the gaps in meeting these needs?
The more “no” answers, the more likely the L&D team will be in a state of constant response and may feel exhausted and overwhelmed. These are indicators of an immature department that has informal processes and practices, and does not have data to help guide or inform process improvements. This means that you cannot be agile.
Less response; more agile satisfaction
In addition to looking at maturity through common processes and operational practices, we can also look at maturity through the perspective of agility.
As an example, let’s take a look at what your team did to support the first shift in the workplace. First consider the scale from passive to active, and the following evaluations of yourself and your team:
Does your L&D team have methods that can be modified or adjusted (to help change)?
Is this lawsuit suspended? If yes, what is the percentage? How long does it last?
Is your entire team available, or are you also managing the dynamics of life due to changes in the workplace?
Has new technology been introduced into the company’s workflow?
Does your equipment require new technologies specifically designed to assist the workflow?
By asking these questions, you are creating a profile on the previous state and the current state. Knowing that another transition is coming, compare the two states and discuss it with your team. Let them help you identify potential gaps and risks, and develop plans and approaches to solve each problem.
Most importantly, this information is properly recorded and shared with your team. They will be valued for their knowledge and strategic thinking, especially when the result is a high-performing team (also known as agile).
Before you start to grow
The above questions may be enough to get you started, but I want to end with an idea that can help you accept these suggestions and advance them faster: The
maturity model is not new. There are many models. The two I recommend to check are Learning Business Maturity Model™ and HighImpact Learning Organization Maturity by Jeff Cobb and Celisa Steele.

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