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Angela is happy to begin her new role as Director of Talent Development. His team is also very excited. But in the process of the interview, a direct report impressed Angela’s comments: “We need foresight and leadership. We haven’t been like this for a long time.” Angela noticed this comment and couldn’t help but wonder if it was announcing the next Challenge.
In its first week, it was obvious that the team lacked focus and direction. Many early meetings were full of discussions about team identity, mission, and values. Angela had to face the fact that she did not expect that she needed to build that base so quickly. The former manager of the team has been there for 10 years, so she believes that, at least initially, the team will use the status quo as a guide until she understands her direction. Instead, he inherited an abandoned ship, and he must return to seaworthiness.
After several weeks of discussion and research, Angela was able to clearly express her vision in the mirror. Now, you need to tell your team. Angela designed a presentation and shared it in the last 10 minutes of the weekly team meeting. Between rolling eyes and sporadic questions, Angela can only draw the conclusion that nobody cares.
A group of people left the meeting room, Angela sighed and turned to grab the laptop.
“Angela!” Andrew, the leader of his team, was left behind. “If you don’t mind, I have some questions for you.”
“Of course. What happens?”
“Why is there such a vision? what does this mean to you? What does it mean to us? ”
Angela was unable to answer Andrew’s question, which convinced her that the missing connection could be in her. But what is more problematic for her is where the problems appear within Andrew.
The era of graphs, graphs, and data will come, but that time is not now. Angela’s relationship with the team is still new. They still do not understand her, nor do they understand her values ​​and beliefs. As the team learns about her experience, knowing more about her can build trust, build rapport, and help her demonstrate abilities.
She knew she had to start laying the foundation before she could build anything on it. Sharing your story can make this process easier.
Angela is an experienced professional and speaker who uses storytelling to explain complex concepts and sell ideas to senior management and clients. She has never deliberately used the narrative to “sell herself” or her personal beliefs. Since she is a rookie, she must begin by answering Andrew’s questions on her own.
Here are four principles Angela can follow to help her find her vision and voice.
Experience carries the story
Begins with intent
The meaning is very important
Transformation is transformative
Experience carries the story
Storytelling is not about turning boring content into… well, a magical “panacea”. When I ask people why stories help convey content, I usually hear answers such as stories that build empathy, evoke emotion, and make the content memorable.
But the story does not essentially do anything that people list. The narrator must first understand which ideas trigger empathy, emotion, and memory, and then construct a narrative around them. The process starts with identifying experiences, and when these experiences are shared, it will help to get the necessary responses. History is not magic. They just provide a vehicle for the structure and strategy to bring what we put into it to life.
Angela needs to consider what experiences in her personal or professional career determine the vision she wants to share with the team. Simply saying you believe in an idea may not be enough to get others to believe it. If you support ideas by sharing your life experience, you can gain credibility. At the very least, it can be compelling to see that the experience and the profound impact it has on your worldview affect you.
It begins with intention
Although the story is the result of our efforts, the journey will not begin there. It starts with sharing the desire to shape your experience and what you learned in the process. This distinction is important because it’s not about what you want the story to do, but what you want people to do after hearing your experience.
This call to action is your intention. Once people understand your vision and understand the experiences that support its existence, they need to know what this means to them and how they should do it. Only they can decide how what you say is consistent with their values, but you must clearly know what action you want them to take.
Angela hopes her vision is to get everyone on the same page and moving in the same direction. She hopes that if you strengthen your vision through your words and deeds, everyone will participate in supporting behaviors that reflect this vision in everything they do. Therefore, your intention is to incorporate behaviors that fit your vision into your daily work, and ultimately, your vision for the team supports your vision in some way.
Meaning Matters
Digging your memory and finding an experience that supports your intentions is an essential initial step. But how do you know which experiences will be good stories?
The answer lies in what those experiences mean to you. In this case, there are many ways to explain the word “meaning”. I define “meaning” as how the experience ultimately changes my thoughts, opinions, feelings, or beliefs.
The meaning of the experience is not always obvious. The best storytellers try to make sense of these experiences, and this intention becomes organic over time. While it is a bad idea to meditate and stay too long, purposely gaining meaning from the events that shape you is essential for development to become

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