Has Mobile Learning Changed? | Learning Solutions Magazine

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With the widespread appearance of mobile devices, mobile learning has begun to become a “thing”, but over time, it has undergone many evolutions. In 2000, before the establishment of the Learning Association, Clark Quinn wrote “mobile learning” as “e-learning provided through mobile computing devices.” In 2005, Ellen Wagner said in an interview with Bill Brandon (which is no longer available online), “Mobile learning is indeed the next step or wave of using technology to provide channels for learning and support.”
Slow development
But as Ara Ohanian pointed out in her article “Mobile learning at the tipping point”, it took longer than expected. In 2010, “anytime, anywhere” was widely accepted, and implementation became practical. The actual turning point was postponed due to severe underestimation of the complexity of the infrastructure and the necessary IT and organizational support. In 2011, Clark Quinn’s book “Designing Mobile Learning: Using the Mobile Revolution to Promote Organizational Performance” appeared and shifted most of the focus from processing equipment, connectivity, and course delivery to supporting performance.
In his 2012 book “Ubiquitous Learning: How Mobile Content Strategies Change Training”, Chad Udell continued to advance the understanding of mobile learning by identifying four main usage categories:
Conversion content (e-learning, Work assistance, student-led training instructors, performance support)
Business processes (SCM, ERP, CRM, dating applications, custom-developed enterprise software)
Social and user generation (community generated content, wiki, chat, Twitter)
Fully mobile (virtual or augmented reality, GPS) data, other sensors, touch and touch, voice and messaging services)
Are these categories still a good analysis?
Udell was one of the first to advise designers to consider “mobile first”. We know that from 2021 to 2030, upgrading skills should be a priority, but the scope should include not only professional employees, but also front-line and deskless employees, employees in mixed office environments, employees working from home, and working in the office Employees.
In the past 20 years, what we call “mobile learning” obviously can solve most of the needs, but there is more. We have been considering linking learning sources with known materials available in company resources (LMS and LXP), and employees want to bridge the gap in their performance skills from any source available in the current workflow – choose to turn on their phones smart and visit Google. The content they need is on the web, not in the LMS. How will this change our concept of mobile learning? In this case, how do instructional designers think about “mobile devices first”?
I asked Chad this question and he gave me this idea:
“Although Learning Everywhere was written in 2012, I still feel that the main category of mobile learning called Hold is very good. One dimension to consider when reviewing these is context, whether it is the time, environment, or intent of the content being accessed or delivered. Of course, intention is a constantly changing dimension. With artificial intelligence and machine learning, students themselves may not even be able to determine their intentions. It may be derived from algorithms that are driven by your previous use, the activities of colleagues or colleagues, the strategic goals of the organization, or other factors that are invisible to other users but easily recognized by the processor that provides the content. In our system based on Float and SparkLearn, we take all these elements into consideration to increase relevance to users and ultimately provide users with content in a timely manner, but the content is needed to provide these suggestions before users may even know them. These content recommendations can be internal content, external web pages, podcasts, videos, games or other interactive content, manuals, documents, etc. managed in the system. For the main types of content, it is a very large but homogeneous mix, established in the context of the user. “Is
mobile learning or mobile learning? The changes in the
world are not just delivery options. The important changes are the development of the entire technology ecosystem with multiple access points and the increasing number of tasks and outcomes. The beings Human and systems are increasingly interconnected.With mobile devices, and later with human mobility, designers must now consider that the learning environment is fluid, which may involve machines that are “aware” of the existence of devices. humans and depend on the results of cooperation between humans and machines. The precursor to this emerging situation may be the “universal control” recently announced by Apple, in which devices can (temporarily) transfer the execution of tasks to each other under the guidance of the person who (temporarily) determines the end result. Where does learning take place? Or is it just a more advanced form of performance support?
Human employees are now increasingly immersed in the ecosystem and teams. This is the next step in the development of mobile learning, as well as our next challenge as learning designers: building systems and skills that use development.

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