What I Learned: 4 Things L&D Should Borrow from Peloton

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This morning I ran into 306 on my bike and I was very excited!
For experienced Peloton riders, this may not be a very impressive number, but it wasn’t until May that I took a spinning course or ridden an exercise bike or any type of bicycle. My home needs to get rid of the sedentary environment, which has taken over from our collective transition to 100% remote work. So we invested in Peloton. (Picture 1)
Picture 1: This is exactly what I look like when I ride a bicycle. I swear! 🙂
63 days ago, after registering 88 in my first trip, I plan to reach a total output of 300 by the end of June. During trip 60, I reached my goal 23 days ahead of schedule. If it is!
In the first two months of my last fitness trip, I learned a lot. I learned that when you are stuck on a bike and firmly “in the area,” there is nothing more exciting than dropping a bottle of water on the ground mid-ride. I learned that the seat cushion is absolutely essential in the rotation course. I also learned what happens when Cody Riggsby plays Britney Spears.
My biggest gain from the two months of Peloton is the amount of insights L&D can learn from connected fitness. The industry has soared in the past year, and the market size is expected to reach 59 billion U.S. dollars by 2027, higher than the 2019 estimate of 6.04 billion U.S. dollars. Of course, this accelerated growth can be attributed to the pandemic in gyms and fitness centers. Unfortunately the right place, unfortunately the right time. However, as the office reopens, remote work is becoming a mixed reality, and many people (including myself) will stick to digital fitness when facilities are available.
Exercise at home is not new. I have a Shaun T exercise DVD box to prove this point. But modern technology has developed experiences in ways that can inspire L&D solutions.
Progress
Fitness is iterative, like learning. You will be better at the same time. However, it is difficult to answer the question “How am I?” Without the coach providing constant feedback. (Picture 2) It is easy to get discouraged because you feel like you are not making progress.
Figure 2: The bike display shows various indicators to guide your riding experience
Peloton solves this problem through analysis. During the ride, the indicators on the screen will show when I did or did not reach the goal according to the guidance of the coach. The cadence and resistance indicators provide simple goals to follow, allowing me to focus on the factors that have the greatest impact on exercise, such as form and breathing. (Picture 3)
Picture 3: Statistics of my personal best trip:
so far I will check my results in the mobile application after each trip. I didn’t dig into the numbers as deeply as possible. Instead, I focused on my overall progress and how this trip compares to my previous posts. Going from 88 to 306 in two months made me feel good about the hard work I put into exercise. If I am not satisfied with the results of the trip, I will do a more detailed review to find out where I fell and how to improve tomorrow. How does
L&D apply data and analysis to help people understand their learning progress during and after training? Do you constantly measure factors such as knowledge growth and behavior changes to help people realize the true results of their learning efforts?
Participation
Peloton uses on-screen leaderboards when exercising. In the past, I have written about my experience applying gamification in learning programs. I firmly believe in the effective use of participation mechanisms. So you can assume that I will lean towards this part of the Peloton experience. However, I don’t ride a bike so I can compare myself to others. I focus on my progress. That is why I have never seen the leaderboard. That’s why it’s a great feature, because I can turn it off.
Commitment is personal. What motivates me may not motivate you. Therefore, the best gamification systems allow users to make their own decisions on how to participate. Some people will change their behavior to earn points, climb leaderboards, and get rewards. If others are forced to enter a competitive environment, they will disengage. Scrolling through my collection of Peloton badges is fun, but it won’t bring me back to my next trip. How does
L&D use flexible engagement strategies to help people understand their personal motivations? Do you provide options on how people interact with the gamification system so that they can find their learning value proposition?
Direction
I owe most of the credit to my progress at Peloton. But I don’t have all the credit. The mentor is an important part of my experience. They take me out of my comfort zone while allowing me to focus on the right things in every trip. They can’t see me. They cannot provide specific comments. But they always know when to say the right thing. At the beginning of the course, they reminded me to focus on the basics, such as breathing and form. When I started to feel tired about two-thirds of the journey, they would “disturb me” and increase my motivation. I arrange trips based on who is teaching, not the time I like. How does
L&D work with coaches and managers to ensure that people get the guidance they need to do the best job? Are you training managers with practical insights that they can use to strengthen their coaching conversations so that they can say the right words at the right time?
Habit Building
I do four things every day:
● Take a walk while listening to podcasts (recently many Kara Swisher)

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